Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Linux Namespaces - Part 1

Overview

First of all I would like to give credit to Docker which motivated me to write this blog, I've been using docker for more then 6 months but I always wondered how things are happening behind the scene. So I started in depth learning of Docker and here I am talking about Namespace which is the core concept used by Docker.

Before talking about Namespaces in Linux, it is very important to know that what namespaces actually is?

Let's take an example, We have two people with the same first name Abhishek Dubey and Abhishek Rawat but we can differentiate them on the basis of their surname Dubey and Rawat. So you can think surname as a namespace.

In Linux, namespaces are used to provide isolation for objects from other objects. So that anything will happen in namespaces will remain in that particular namespace and doesn't affect other objects of other namespaces. For example:- we can have the same type of objects in different namespaces as they are isolated from each other.

In short, due to isolation, namespaces limits how much we can see.

Now you would be having a good conceptual idea of Namespace let's try to understand them in the context of Linux Operating System.

Linux Namespaces

Linux namespace forms a single hierarchy, with all processes and that is init. Usually, privileged processes and services can trace or kill other processes. Linux namespaces provide the functionality to have many hierarchies of processes with their own "subtrees", such that, processes in one subtree can't access or even know those of another.

A namespace wraps a global system resource (For ex:- PID) using the abstraction that makes it appear to processes within the namespace that they have, using their own isolated instance of the said resource.































In the above figure, we have a process named 1 which is the first PID and from 1 parent process there are new PIDs are generated just like a tree. If you see the 6th PID in which we are creating a subtree, there actually we are creating a different namespace. In the new namespace, 6th PID will be its first and parent PID. So the child processes of 6th PID cannot see the parent process or namespace but the parent process can see the child PIDs of the subtree.

Let's take PID namespace as an example to understand it more clearly. Without namespace, all processes descend(move downwards) hierarchically from First PID i.e. init. If we create PID namespace and run a process in it, the process becomes the First PID in that namespace. In this case, we wrap a global system resource(PID). The process that creates the namespace still remains in the parent namespace but makes it child for the root of the new process tree.

This means that the processes within the new namespace cannot see the parent process but the parent process can see the child namespace process. 

I hope you have got a clear understanding of Namespaces concepts & what purpose they serve in a Linux OS. The next blog of this series will talk about how we use namespace to restrict usage of system resources such as network, mounts, cgroups...

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