Redis Cluster: Setup, Sharding and Failover Testing

Watching cluster sharding and failover management is as gripping as visualizing a robotic machinery work.

My last blog on Redis Cluster was primarily focussed on its related concepts and requirements. I would highly recommend to go through the concepts first to have better understanding.

Here, I will straight forward move to its setup along with the behaviour of cluster when I intentionally turned down one Redis service on one of the node.
Let’s start from the scratch.

Continue reading “Redis Cluster: Setup, Sharding and Failover Testing”

Redis Cluster: Architecture, Replication, Sharding and Failover

Speed fascinates everyone, but only if its under control.

It is well said and a proven fact that everyone needs to implement a cache at some point in their application lifecycle, and this has become our requirement too.

During the initial phase we placed Redis in a Master Slave mode with next phase involving Sentinal setup to withstand Master failover. I would like to throw some light on their architecture along with pros and cons so I can put emphasis on why I finally migrated to Redis Cluster.

Redis Master/Slave

Redis replication is a very simple to use and configure master-slave replication  that allows slave Redis servers to be exact copies of master servers.

What forced me to look for Redis Sentinel

When using Master-Slave architecture

  • There will be only one Master with multiple slaves for replication.
  • All write goes to Master, which creates more load on master node.
  • If Master goes down, the whole architecture is prone to SPOF (Single point of failure).
  • M-S architecture does not helps in scaling, when your user base grows.
  • So we need a process to Monitor Master in case of failure or shutdown, that is Sentinel.

Redis Sentinel

Initial Setup
Failover Handling

I was still concerned about the below Sharding of data for best performance

Concept of Redis Cluster

“A query that used to take an hour can run in seconds on cache”.

Redis Cluster is an active-passive cluster implementation that consists of master and slave nodes. The cluster uses hash partitioning to split the key space into 16,384 key slots, with each master responsible for a subset of those slots. 

Each slave replicates a specific master and can be reassigned to replicate another master or be elected to a master node as needed. 

Ports Communication

Each node in a cluster requires two TCP ports. 

  • One port is used for client connections and communications. This is the port you would configure into client applications or command line tools. 
  • Second required port is reserved for node-to-node communication that occurs in a binary protocol and allows the nodes to discuss configuration and node availability.

Failover

When a master fails or is found to be unreachable by the majority of the cluster as determined by the nodes communication via the gossip port, the remaining masters hold a vote and elect one of the failing masters’ slaves to take its place. 

Rejoining The Cluster

When the failing master eventually rejoins the cluster, it will join as a slave and begin to replicate another master.

Sharding

Redis sharded data automatically into the servers.
Redis has a concept of hash slot in order to split data. All the data are divided into slots.
There are 16384 slots. These slots are divided by the number of servers.

If there are 3 servers; A, B and C then

  • Server 1 contains hash slots from 0 to 5500.
  • Server 2 contains hash slots from 5501 to 11000.
  • Server 3 contains hash slots from 11001 to 16383.

6 Node M/S Cluster

In a 6 node cluster mode, 3 nodes will be serving as a master and the 3 node will be their respective slave.

Here, Redis service will be running on port 6379 on all servers in the cluster. Each master server is replicating the keys to its respective redis slave node assigned during cluster creation process.

3 Node M/S Cluster

In a 3 node cluster mode, there will be 2 redis services running on each server on different ports. All 3 nodes will be serving as a master with redis slave on cross nodes.

Here, two redis services will be running on each server on two different ports and each master is replicating the keys to its respective redis slave running on other node.

WHAT IF Redis Goes Down

1 node goes down in a 6 node Redis Cluster

If one of the node goes down in Redis 6-node cluster setup, its respective slave will be promoted as master.

In above example, master Server3 goes down and it slave Server6 is promoted as master.

1 node goes down in a 3 node Redis Cluster

If one of the node goes down in Redis 3-node cluster setup, its respective slave running on the separate node will be promoted to master.

In above example, Server 3 goes down and slave running on Server1 is promoted to master.

Redis service goes down on one of the 3 node Redis Cluster

If redis service goes down on one of the node in Redis 3-node cluster setup, its respective slave will be promoted as master.

Conclusion

Although, this methodology will prevent Redis Cluster in partial Failover scenarios only, but if we want full failover we need to look for Disaster Recovery techniques as well.

Well this implementation helped me having a sound sleep while thinking of Redis availability, sharding and performance.

Enough of reading, eager to know how this all works when it comes to implementation. Don’t worry, my next blog Redis Cluster: Setup, Sharding and Failover Testing will be guiding you through the process.

Enjoy happy and safe DIWALI

Stay Away Replication Lag !

Recently, I got a requirement to facilitate backup for the data and a way to analyze it without using the main database. MySQL replication is a process that allows you to easily maintain multiple copies of MySQL data by having them copied automatically from a master to a slave database. 

Panic Starts

Everything was running smoothly in the night I configured it. But the joy didn’t last for long as the traffic hits in the morning, slave starts getting behind the master with few seconds which increases with the activity on the application. At the peak time, it was playing in thousands of second.

 What now, I had to dig deep into MySQL Replication

  • How it works 
  • What can probably cause the lag
  • An approach that minimizes or eliminates it

How MySQL Replication Works

On the master

First of all, master writes replication events to a special log called binary log. This is usually a very lightweight activity because writes are buffered and they are sequential. The binary log file stores data that replication slave will be reading later.

On the replica

When you start replication, two threads are started on the slave:
1. IO thread
This process connects to a master, reads binary log events from the master as they come in and just copies them over to a local log file called relay log.
Even though there’s only one thread reading the binary log from the master and one writing relay log on the slave, very rarely copying of replication events is a slower element of the replication. There could be a network delay, causing a steady delay of a few hundred milliseconds.
If you want to see where IO thread currently is, check the following in “show slave status \G”
Master_Log_File – last file copied from the master (most of the time it would be the same as last binary log written by a master)
Read_Master_Log_Pos – binary log from the master is copied over to the relay log on the slave up until this position.
And then you can compare it to the output of “show master status/G” from the master.

mysql> show master status\G;
*************************** 1. row ***************************
             File: db01-binary-log.000032
         Position: 1008761891
     Binlog_Do_DB: 
 Binlog_Ignore_DB: 
Executed_Gtid_Set: 
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

2. SQL thread
The second process – SQL thread – reads events from a relay log stored locally on the replication slave (the file that was written by IO thread) and then applies them as fast as possible.
Going back to “show slave status /G”, you can get the current status of SQL thread from the following variables:
Relay_Master_Log_File – binary log from the master, that SQL thread is “working on” (in reality it is working on relay log, so it’s just a convenient way to display information)
Exec_Master_Log_Pos – which position from the master binary log is being executed by SQL thread.

mysql> show slave status\G;
*************************** 1. row ***************************
               Slave_IO_State: Waiting for master to send event
                  Master_Host: <master_ip>
                  Master_User: <replication_user>
                  Master_Port: 3306
                Connect_Retry: 60
              Master_Log_File: db01-binary-log.000032
          Read_Master_Log_Pos: 1008768810
               Relay_Log_File: relay-bin.000093
                Relay_Log_Pos: 1008769035
        Relay_Master_Log_File: db01-binary-log.000032
             Slave_IO_Running: Yes
            Slave_SQL_Running: Yes
.
.
          Exec_Master_Log_Pos: 1008768810
              Relay_Log_Space: 1008769305
.
.
        Seconds_Behind_Master: 0
.
.
      Slave_SQL_Running_State: Slave has read all relay log; waiting for more updates
.
.
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Why Replication Lag Occurred

Replication lag occurs when the slaves cannot keep up with the updates occurring on the master. Unapplied changes accumulate in the slave’s relay logs and the version of the database on the slaves becomes increasingly different from that of the master.

Caught The Culprit

Let me take you through my journey how I crossed the river. 
First, I took the reference to multiple blogs and started gobbling my mind with possible reasons suggesting 

  • Hardware Faults (getting RAID in degraded mode)
  • MySQL Config Updates 
    • setting sync_binlog=1
    • enabling log_slave_updates
    • setting innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit=1
    • updating slave_parallel_workers to a higher value
    • changing slave_parallel_type to support more parallel workers
  • Restarting Replication 

But unfortunately, or say, it was my benightedness towards Database Administration that I was still searching for that twig which can help me from drowning.
And finally, I found one, my DBA friend who suggested me to look for the Binary Log Format that I am using. Let’s see what it is

Binary Logging Formats

The server uses several logging formats to record information in the binary log. The exact format employed depends on the version of MySQL being used. There are three logging formats:
STATEMENT: With statement-based replication, every SQL statement that could modify data is logged on the master. Then those SQL statements are replayed on the slaves against the same dataset and in the same context. There is always less data that is to be transferred between the master and the slave. But, the data inconsistency issue between the master and the slave that creeps up due to the way this kind of replication works.
ROW: With row-based replication, every “row modification” is logged on the master and is then applied to the slave. With row-based replication, each and every change can be replicated and hence this is the safest form of replication. On a system that frequently UPDATE a large number of rows, it produces very large update logs and generates a lot of network traffic between the master and the slave.
MIXED: A third option is also available: mixed logging. With mixed logging, statement-based logging is used by default, but the logging mode switches automatically to row-based in certain cases.

Changing Binary Log Format

The Binary Log Format is updated on Master MySQL server and requires MySQL service restart to reflect. It can be done for Global, Runtime or Session.

  • set at runtime with –binlog-format=format
  • setting the global (with the SUPER privilege)
  • session value of the binlog_format server variable
mysql> SET GLOBAL binlog_format=MIXED;

mysql> SET SESSION binlog_format=ROW;

mysql> SET binlog_format=STATEMENT; 

So, earlier I was using STATEMENT BinLog Format, which is default one. Since I switched to MIXED BinLog Format, I am very delighted to share the below stats.
Current status of  Master Read and Slave Execute position difference and Slave Lag (in sec), both are ZERO.

Replication Lag (in Seconds) graph for a month, powered by Prometheus-Grafana.

Now, What’s next ??