Setup Percona Postgresql Through the Awsesome(OSM) Ansible Role

Percona is known for its software solutions for most Databases. It gives a single solution with the best and most critical enterprise components from the open-source community.

In terms of monitoring, it provides Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) tool which is a best-of-breed monitoring solution. It helps you reduce complexity, optimise performance, and improve the security of your business-critical database environments.

Percona is a well-known solution for MySQL databases, including monitoring and performance tools that help manage and gain insight into open source database environments. It also provides an XtraBackup tool for MySQL which ease the problem of incremental backup of DB efficiently.

Continue reading “Setup Percona Postgresql Through the Awsesome(OSM) Ansible Role”

Postgres – CIS Benchmark

PostgreSQL Database Security Audit - 2ndQuadrant | PostgreSQL

We have seen many security incidents. Any breach in security cause concern among enterprises. To be honest it not only concern them, it also gives birth to their nightmare, distrust and scepticism as organisation. The root cause of this distrust is improper implementation and configuration.

Opstree Security has started a new initiative where we rigorously analyse and implement CIS Benchmark of every tools being used today.

In this CIS series, we will discuss the CIS Benchmarks of PostgreSQL.

PostgreSQL

For those who are new to PostgreSQL . Let us give you a quick summary of it.

Continue reading “Postgres – CIS Benchmark”

Monitoring Druid with Prometheus

Druid Exporter – A Prometheus agent for Druid Database

A while back we got the requirement for working on Apache Druid. By working on Apache Druid, We mean setup, management, and monitoring. Since it was a new topic for us we started evaluating it and we actually find it has a lot of amazing features.

So for the people who don’t have an idea about Druid and just starting with Druid. Let me give a quick walk-through of it.

Continue reading “Monitoring Druid with Prometheus”

Redis Best Practices and Performance Tuning

One of the thing that I love about my organization is that you don’t have to do the same repetitive work, you will always get the chance to explore some new technologies. The same chance came across to me a few days back when one of our clients was facing issue with Redis.
They were using the Redis Cluster with Sentinel for which they were facing issue regarding performance, whenever the connection request was high the Redis Cluster was not able to bear the load.
Since they were using a decent configuration of the server in terms of CPU and Memory but the result was the same. So now what????
The Answer was to tune the performance.

There are plenty of Redis performance articles out there, but I wanted to share my experience as a DevOps with Redis by creating an article which will include the most essential and important stuff that is needed for a Developer or a DevOps Engineer.

So let’s get started.

 TCP-KeepAlive

Keepalive is a method to allow the same TCP connection for HTTP conversation instead of opening a new one with each new request.

In simple words, if the keepalive is off the Redis will open a new connection for every request which will slow down its performance. If the keepalive is on then Redis will use the same TCP connection for requests.

Let’s see the graph for more details. The Red Bar shows the output when keepalive is on and Blue Bar shows the output when keepalive is off

For enabling the TCP keepalive, Edit the redis configuration and update this value.

vim /etc/redis/redis.conf
# Update the value to 0
tcp-keepalive 0

Pipelining

This feature could be your lifesaver in terms of Redis Performance. Pipelining facilitates a client to send multiple requests to the server without waiting for the replies at all and finally reads the reply in a single step.

For example:-

1

You can also see in the graph as well.

Pipelining will increase the performance of redis drastically.

Max-Connection

Max-connection is the parameter in which is used to define the maximum connection limit to the Redis Server. You can set that value accordingly (Considering your server specification) with the following steps.

sudo vim /etc/rc.local

# make sure this line is just before of exit 0.
sysctl -w net.core.somaxconn=65365

This step requires the reboot if you don’t want to reboot the server execute the same sysctl command on the terminal itself.

Overcommit Memory

Overcommit memory is a kernel parameter which checks if the memory is available or not. If the overcommit memory value is 0 then there is a chance that your Redis will get OOM (Out of Memory) error. So do me a favor and change its value to 1 by using the following steps

echo 'vm.overcommit_memory = 1' >> /etc/sysctl.conf

RDB Persistence and Append Only File

RDB persistence and Append Only File options are used to persist data on disk. If you are using the cluster mode of Redis then the RDB persistence and AOF is not required. So simply comment out these lines in redis.conf

sudo vim /etc/redis/redis.conf

# Comment out these lines
save 900 1
save 300 10
save 60 10000

rdbcompression no
rdbchecksum no

appendonly no

Transparent Huge Page(THP)

Most of the people are not aware of this term. Basically, For making the translation of physical and virtual memory kernel uses the concept of paging. This feature was defined to enhance the memory mapping process but somehow it slows down the databases which are memory based (for example – in the case of Redis). To overcome this issue you can disable THP.

sudo vim /etc/rc.local # Add this line before exit 0 echo never > /sys/kernel/mm/transparent_hugepage/enabled

As graph also shows the difference in performance. The Red Bar is showing THP disabled performance and Blue Bar is showing THP disabled performance.

Some Other Basic Measures in Redis Configuration

Config Option

Value

Description

maxmemory

70% of the system

maxmemory should be 70 percent of the system so that it will not take all the resource of the server.

maxmemory-policy

volatile-lru

It adds a random key with an expiry time

loglevel

notice

Loglevel should be “notice”, so that log will not take too much resource

timeout

300

There should be a timeout value as well in redis configuration which prevents redis from spending too much time on the connection. It closes the connection of the client if it is ideal for more than 300 seconds.

So now your redis is ready to give a killer performance. In this blog, we have discussed redis best practices and performance tuning.
There are multiple factors which are yet to be explored to enhance the performance of Redis if you find that before I do, please let me know to improve this blog.

In my next blog, I will discuss around how can we do Redis Performance Testing and how we are doing it in our Organisation.

Migrate your data between various Databases

Data Migration Service

 
Have you ever thought about migrating your production database from one platform to another
and dropped this idea later, because it was too risky, you were not ready to
bare a downtime?
If yes, then please pay attention because this is what we are going to perform
in this article.
A few days back we’re trying to migrate our production MySQL RDS from AWS to GCP,  SQL, and we had to migrate data without downtime, accurate and
real-time and that too without the help
of any Database Administrator.
 
After doing a bit research and evaluating few services we finally started working on AWS DMS (Data Migration Service) and figured out this is a great service to migrate a
different kind of data.
 
You can migrate your data to and from the most widely used commercial and open-source databases, and database platforms. Databases like Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, and
PostgreSQL, MongoDB.
The source database remains fully operational during the migration,
The service supports
homogeneous migrations such as Oracle to Oracle,
and also heterogeneous migrations between different database platforms.
 

Let’s discuss some important features of AWS DMS:

 
  • Migrates the database securely, quickly and accurately.
  • No downtime required, works as schema converter as well.
  • Supports various type or database like MySQL, MongoDB, PSQL etc.
  • Migrates real-time data also synchronize ongoing changes.
  • Data validation is available to verify database.
  • Compatible with a long range of database platforms like RDS, Google SQL, on-premises etc.
  • Inexpensive (Pricing is based on the compute resources used during the migration process).
This is a typical migration scenario.
Let’s perform step by step migration:

Note: We’ve performed migration from AWS RDS
to GCP SQL, you can choose database source and
destination as per your requirement.

  1. Create replication instance:
    A replication instance initiates the connection between the source and target databases, transfers the data, cache any changes that occur on the source database during the initial data load.
    Use the fields to below to configure the parameters of your new replication instance including network and security information, encryption details, select instance class as per requirement.

    After completion, all mandatory fields click the next tab, and you will be redirected
    to Replication Instance tab.
    Grab a coffee quickly while the instance is getting ready.

    Hope you are ready with your coffee because the instance is ready now.


  2. Now we are to create two endpoints “Source” and “Target” 2.1 Create Source Endpoint:

    Click on “Run test” tab after completing all fields, make sure your Replication instance IP is whitelisted
    under security group. 2.2 Create Target Endpoint


    Click on “Run test” tab again after completing all fields, make sure your Replication instance IP is whitelisted under target DB authorization.
    Now we’ve ready Replication Instance, Source Endpoint, and Target Endpoint.
  3. Finally, we’ll create a “Replication Task” to start replication.
    Fill the fields like:
  • Task Name: any name
  • Replication Instance: The instance we’ve created above
  • Source Endpoint: The source database
  • Target Endpoint: The target database
  • Migration Type: Here I choose “Migration existing data and replication
    ongoing” because we needed ongoing changes.
 
4. Verify the task status now.
Once all the fields are completed click on the “Create task” and you will be
redirected to “Tasks”
Tab.
Check your task status
 
The task has been successfully completed now, you can verify the inserts tabs and validation tab,
The migration is done successfully if Validation State is “Validated” that means migration has been performed successfully.